Pacific maritime professionals boost their knowledge of international shipping standards PDF Print E-mail

Tuesday 11 November 2014, Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC), Suva, Fiji –

 

alt

The International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) has now become the key instrument guiding countries on ISPS security compliance of their international ports and ships. Over the years, the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) has been working closely with many Pacific ports to assist in maintaining this compliance.
SPC’s Transport Programme is currently undertaking a number of maritime-related activities in Nauru (25–29 August), as part of SPC’s technical assistance to its member countries.

An important resource that some Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs) have used to attract much-needed foreign earnings is their pool of appropriately qualified and experienced seafarers working in the international shipping industry. 

 

Recent assessments of the region’s maritime administrations, training institutes and the shipping industry have, however, highlighted a need for more qualified maritime professionals.

 

Responding to this need, a training course – Assessment and Examination of Seafarers – was organised for staff of maritime administrations and training institutions in Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu. Organised by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) in collaboration with the Secretariat of the Pacific Community’s Transport Programme, the course was held in Suva, Fiji, earlier this month.

 

The course was based on the STCW Convention (International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers). STCW defines the industry standard for mariners/seafarers in carrying out functions aboard vessels, which lessens the likelihood of accidents and unfortunate incidents. Prospective seafarers are required to undergo basic training in order to be awarded a certificate attesting that they have been trained and are competent to work on a seagoing vessel.

 

 

Last Updated on Thursday, 13 November 2014 10:27
Read more...
 
Pacific regions maritime port officers gather for 39th PMTA Conference in Niue PDF Print E-mail

Wednesday 29 October 2014, Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC), Suva, Fiji –

 

alt

The International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) has now become the key instrument guiding countries on ISPS security compliance of their international ports and ships. Over the years, the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) has been working closely with many Pacific ports to assist in maintaining this compliance.
SPC’s Transport Programme is currently undertaking a number of maritime-related activities in Nauru (25–29 August), as part of SPC’s technical assistance to its member countries.

The safety and security of all ships navigating the vast Pacific Ocean are crucial for maritime transportation and trade within the region. In order to improve safety and security, ports and infrastructure providers need to embrace a business outlook, with operation and service strategies that adhere to legislation and encourage improved performance.

 

A commercial approach will tend to refine efficiencies and increase regular usage.

 

To discuss this further, the Pacific Maritime Transport Alliance (PMTA), in partnership with the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) and the Government of Niue, is hosting the 39th PMTA Conference in Alofi, Niue from 28 October–1 November.

 

The theme of the conference is ‘Our Pacific shores, the waves of possibilities’. The conference aims to promote regional cooperation, friendship and understanding among member ports and port users through mutual alliances and the exchange of knowledge, as well as the dissemination of information useful to port owners, operators and users of port services. It is envisaged that this conference will promote measures to increase efficiency and safety and will facilitate the harmonious development of ports in the Pacific region.

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 29 October 2014 15:56
Read more...
 
Central Pacific Shipping Commission (CPSC) – let us all continue to work together to make a tangible difference in our communities PDF Print E-mail

Monday 27 October 2014, Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC), Suva, Fiji –

 

alt

The International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) has now become the key instrument guiding countries on ISPS security compliance of their international ports and ships. Over the years, the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) has been working closely with many Pacific ports to assist in maintaining this compliance.
SPC’s Transport Programme is currently undertaking a number of maritime-related activities in Nauru (25–29 August), as part of SPC’s technical assistance to its member countries.
'Freight rates are lower, the frequency of services to our countries is increasing and there is evidence that our people are happier with shipping services,’ says the Chair of the Central Pacific Shipping Commission, the Honourable Thomas Heine, Marshall Islands Minister for Transportation and Communication, at the opening of the CPSC annual meeting held in the Suva office of the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) last week (21–23 October).
 
The Pacific region is essentially a large ocean island state. About 98 per cent of it is ocean, making shipping services critical for connectivity and, ultimately, for economic and social development.  However, for a long time, the concern for Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs) has been irregular, expensive shipping services. For the shipping companies, the concern is economic sustainability and ensuring quality of service.  Recognising these concerns, leaders of the small island states of the Pacific called for more reliable, affordable and sustainable shipping services through the creation, in 2010, of a Central Pacific Shipping Commission (CPSC), with country members from Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru and Tuvalu.
 

With SPC’s Transport Programme providing technical and secretariat services, CPSC commenced operations in January 2014 and, so far, its members have seen improved shipping services – more reliable and affordable. There is evidence (from the National Shipping Councils) that complaints against shipping services are declining and some feedback has been extremely encouraging.  Similarly, shipping companies concerns are being progressively addressed and they have reported an increase in the frequency of services and this is expected to continue.

 
Last Updated on Tuesday, 28 October 2014 11:30
Read more...
 
«StartPrev12345678910NextEnd»

Page 4 of 14

 

Login